A Ready Recollection

The Mind Numbing Ponderings Of A Pulpit Preacher

Eat, Pray, Love

 Eat, Pray, Love, is a film that epitomizes feminist-backed solipsism, New Age Eastern mysticism, and the notion that women must unfetter themselves from the ‘enslavement of a boring husband. After leaving the man who loved her, the wife then takes a trip around the world. While embarking on this trip she holds her own, lust and desires in the highest esteem. And female critics, eager to live her adventure vicariously, praise her as a paragon of “female” bravery.

However, this woman victimized an innocent man who loved her. Not only that, she has no remorse, and celebrates the ungodly and hateful things she did to him by taking a trip around the world and taking multiple lovers.

“Fortunately” I missed Oprah’s two episodes “exalting” this woman’s actions. That being said her actions are “morally wrong”. Selfishness must be so deeply ingrained in some women that they can’t even admit there’s anything seriously wrong with what the main character did.

Morally speaking, the story is atrocious. The most offensive thing about the film is its morally repugnant message. Not long ago, I knew a couple, the wife in which saw this movie. She divorced her husband of over 20 years. Her husband contested the divorce and fought to save the marriage. In the process of the divorce she made numerous allegations against him which were all proven to be false. She then bragged about how she was planning a trip to Europe. Talk about life imitating fiction.

I have often wondered how many other “Christian” women have followed the example found in this film and left their husbands and dishonored their vows in such a selfish attempt to “find themselves”.

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April 2, 2012 Posted by | Counseling, FYI | Leave a comment

Do You Suffer From Comparisonitis?

TEXT: Romans 12:3

One of the most debilitating conditions of the 21st century is “comparisonitis”- the tendency to measure one’s worth by comparing oneself to other people.  You won’t find this illness listed in any of the standard medical textbooks, nor will your insurance or any medical compensation program reimburse you for it.  But make no mistake: comparisonitis is a scourge as widespread and destructive as any physical or emotional malady known.

Do you suffer from it? Do you find ways to look down on others and think highly of yourself because you enjoy greater talent, intellect, status or wealth than they? Or do you look down on yourself and envy others because you feel you are not as capable, smart, powerful of rich as they?

Comparisonitis is an ancient disease. Certainly Paul was aware of how deadly it could be.  That’s why he offered the antidote for it-to see ourselves not as we measure up against others, nor as others evaluate us, but as God sees us.  Ultimately, His estimation of our worth it what matters. and to Him we matter a lot!

Do you suffer from comparisonitis? What needs to change in your self-assessment for you to see yourself as God sees you?

April 11, 2011 Posted by | Counseling | Leave a comment

Eight Major Causes Of Depression.

(1) Biological factors.

(2) Learned helplessness (sense of being trapped and unable to remedy an intolerable situation),.

(3) Rejection.

(4) Abuse.

(5) Negative thinking.

(6) Life stress.

(7) Anger.

(8) Guilt.

  • Avoid being alone. Force yourself to be with people.
  • Seek help from others.
  • Sing. Music can uplift your spirit as it did for King Saul (1 Samuel 16:14-23).
  • Praise and give thanks. “In everything give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you” (1 Thessalonians 5:18).
  • Lean heavily on the power of prayer.
  • Meet with God’s people on every occasion. “Hope in God, for I shall yet praise Him For the help of His countenance” (Psalm 42:5).

April 4, 2011 Posted by | Counseling | Leave a comment

So What?

A man is in prison; death row to be precise. Soon he will walk what many call “the green mile”. He is a murderer, a vicious piece of filth of the worst kind.  Another is laying in a hospital bed dying of multiple sexually transmitted diseases brought about by a lifetime of perversion and deviancy. Yet another is in a clinic suffering the wages of drug abuse and alcoholism.  Their lives destroyed for all intents and purposes. The thought of “normality” is just a day dream, they can never have the lives they once had.

“So what?” That’s usually the first response. After all, they are only getting what they deserve. The Bible says you reap what you sow.  Again “So what?”

I will not argue that they are getting what they deserve. Our choices have a way of defining us in ways that other aspects of our environment can’t. There will always be consequences.

Let’s look at this from another angle.

The prophet Isaiah said that “we all like sheep have gone astray”. Romans 3:23 tells us that all have sinned. It says that all have fallen short.  Romans 6:23 tells us that the wages of sin is death. Knowing that what do you think YOU deserve? What consequences lay ahead for YOU?

I have met many people in my life who were getting exactly what they deserved for the choices they made. I have seen people suffer and die because of a life lived in sin and darkness and I confess my first thought was “So what?” Shame on me!

The time has come for those of us who “have been called according to His riches” to thank God that we don’t have to get what we deserve. While the wages of sin is death, the gift of God is eternal life.  We can’t earn it or buy it and we definitely don’t deserve it. We all have sinned.  We all have, at one time or another, turned our backs on what we know to be right. But, when we accept God’s gift on His terms no matter the sin or depravity in our past it is God who say’s “So what?”.  You have sinned. So what? I will cleanse you.  You have suffered sorrow. So what? I shall wipe away your tears. You have fallen short. So what? I will bear your burden.

Jimmy

March 31, 2011 Posted by | Bible Study, Counseling, FYI | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Emergency Numbers

These are more effective than 911

When –
You are sad, phone John 14

You have sinned, phone Psalm 51
You are facing danger, phone Psalm 91
People have failed you, phone Psalm 27
Your faith needs stimulation, phone Hebrews 11

You are alone and scared, phone Psalm 23
You are worried, phone Matthew 8:19-34
You are hurt and critical, phone 1 Corinthians 13
You wonder about Christianity, phone 2 Corinthians 5:15-18
You feel like an outcast, phone Romans 8:31-39
You are seeking peace, phone Matthew 11:25-30
It feels as if the world is bigger than God, phone Psalm 90
You need Christ like insurance, phone Romans 8:1-30
You are leaving home for a trip , phone Psalm 121
You are praying for yourself, phone Psalm 87
You require courage for a task, phone Joshua 1
Inflation’s and investments are hogging your thoughts, phone Mark 10:17-31
You are depressive, phone Psalm 27
Your bank account is empty, phone Psalm 37
You lose faith in mankind, phone 1 Corinthians 13
It looks like people are unfriendly, phone John 15
You are losing hope, phone Psalm 126
You feel the world is small comp ared to you, phone Psalm 19
You want to carry fruit, phone John 15
Paul’s secret for happiness, phone Colossians 3:12-17
With big opportunity/ discovery, phone Isaiah 55
To get along with other people, phone Romans 12
For dealing with fear, call Psalm 47
For security, call Psalm 121:3
For assurance, call Mark 8:35
For reassurance, call Psalm 145:18

March 23, 2011 Posted by | Bible Study, Counseling, FYI | Leave a comment

Dealing With Toxic People

The world is full of people who can brighten up a room simply by leaving.  Unfortunately we must deal with them in ways that are uncomfortable. A toxic person often complains, whines and slanders others.  They look for reasons to grip and argue. They love the drama of controversy and often seek avenues to create it.  They somehow live in a world where their way of understanding reality is very different than what is true.

How do we deal with such people? How can we, as Christians, prevent ourselves from sinking in the mire of their perceived yet warped reality?  Here are a few tips for dealing with such people.

1.    Defuse them. Stay calm, and don’t spit angry words at them – this will only stimulate them to engage in more of the difficult behavior. Try ignoring them.  Do not, under any circumstances, join them in bashing, blaming or complaining. Do not bad mouth them to anyone else because then you are sinking down to their level.

2.    Realize that you cannot deal with toxic people the same way you deal with everyone else. In some ways, they need to be treated like children. Give up all hope of engaging these folks in any kind of reasonable conversation. It will never happen, at least with you. Chances are, every such attempt will end in you being blamed for everything. Decide now to quit banging your head against a brick wall.

3.    Protect your self-esteem. If you have regular dealings with someone who tries to portray you as the source of all evil, you need to take active steps to maintain a positive self-image. Remind yourself that this person’s accusations are not the truth. Understand that oftentimes, toxic people are particularly “fact-challenged.” If the attacks have little basis in raw fact, dismiss them. You can’t possibly be as bad as this person would like others to believe you are. Do not defend yourself out loud with outburst of anger, however. It will only provoke the toxic person into another tirade.

4.    Guard against anger. If it helps, consider the fact that your anger is actually a precious gift to the toxic person. Anything you do or say while angry will be used against you over and over again. Toxic people tend to have amazing memories, and they will not hesitate to use a nearly endless laundry list of complaints from the past against you even if they have nothing to do with you. Five years from now, you could be hearing about the off the cuff remark made years ago (which may not have even been said by you). Toxic people will seize anything that provides them the opportunity to lay blame like it was gold.

5.    Realize that toxic people engage in projection. Understand that you are going to be accused of much (or all) of this behavior yourself. If you’re toxic person gets a look at this text, to them it will look like a page about you. Prepare yourself for the fact that the toxic person’s flaws and failings will always be attributed to you. Remember, in their minds, you are at fault for everything! They will have an endless supply of arguments to support this, and if you make the mistake of encouraging them, they will be more than happy to tell you why you are the toxic person, and how ironic it is that you are under the mistaken impression that it is them.

6.    It may also help to call a spade a spade. Realize that you are dealing with an emotional abuser.

7.    When someone is slandering you they do so in order to rally allies. You don’t need to do anything to make the abuser look bad; she/he just digs his/her grave with no help from you. If s/he is slandering you, others are likely to be annoyed if not angry at them. Defuse any rumors with the truth.

8.    Ignore them. How better to undermine someone who wants to rant and rave in order to seek attention than to not give them the attention they want? If they cannot get your attention they will move on to someone else who will give them the attention they crave. Don’t let it be you

 

March 22, 2011 Posted by | Counseling, FYI | Leave a comment

Prayer Therapy

It is generally accepted that the human being has a body, mind, and soul.  Even though the Greek word for soul is psyche, modern psychology has had very little to say about the soul, choosing to concentrate more on the mind and behavior.

Prayer is the communication of the soul. Prayer Therapy helps us use our own spirituality to inform and transform.

The first thing you need to do is to get yourself a “Prayer Journal”. This can be anything from a spiral notebook to pieces of scrap paper. The following steps will help you utilize this to it’s full potential.

1.    Get a prayer journal

2.    Wright your prayers as if you are writing a letter.

3.    Don’t worry about the language you use. Don’t try to sound “churchy” with “thee’s” and “thou’s” .  Don’t be overly formal.

4.    Pray for anything that is on your heart. You may feel the need to express deep dark emotions; this is perfectly fine. Jesus is our example of this. Many times he expressed his negative and hurt feelings in prayer.  The secret is to always end with a positive thought. On one occasion Jesus expressed his angst and emotional distress with the phrase “Let this cup pass from me”. In so doing he poured out his feelings of remorse and sorrow but he ended with a positive thought; “Not my will but yours be done”.  We must do the same. Those deep dark emotions, those feelings of despair and depression should be shared with God.

5.    Keep your journal with you at all times.  When you feel overwhelmed read what you have said to God. Pray some more, writing it down as you go.

When life overwhelms you when you are engulfed in fear, when you feel empty and without purpose, this is a sign that your soul has been hurt.  Changing your thinking or behavior can be helpful, but what you really need is a tonic for our soul.   Prayer is that tonic.

February 23, 2011 Posted by | Counseling | 2 Comments

Education Of The Mind Part 3

For the first aspect I would encourage you to download “Sixteen Days To A Healthy Mind” by Steven Sprouse.

Use the following link.

http://healthymind.home.bresnan.net/Files/16%20days%20printable.pdf

As you follow the directions in this simple workbook it will help you to re-focus you energy and overcome the negative thoughts that emotionally enslave you. Do one session a day and don’t forget to pray as per instructions.

The second aspect involves “Prayer Therapy”.  This is not covered in the workbook but the directions are as follows.

Pray at least three times a day. Use the prayer checklist to record your progress each day. Write down your prayers. Don’t worry about language or being hyper emotional. These things are normal.

Record your prayers in a journal or notebook. PRAY FOR ANYTHING THAT IS ON YOUR HEART! Carry this journal with you and when you begin to feel overwhelmed read what you have said to God.

You may feel the need to express deep dark emotions; this is perfectly fine. Jesus is our example of this. Many times he expressed his negative and hurt feelings in prayer.  The secret is to always end with a positive thought. On one occasion Jesus expressed his angst and emotional distress with the phrase “Let this cup pass from me”. In so doing he poured out his feelings of remorse and sorrow but he ended with a positive thought; “Not my will but yours be done”.  We must do the same.

February 21, 2011 Posted by | Counseling | Leave a comment

Education of the Mind Part 2

How it Works:

The process is two-fold. It incorporates a study of scripture and prayer therapy. The first aspect will focus on several “key passages” that will help re-focus your mind. By studying specific passages and making application, you begin to think about other things.  They key to overcoming emotional distress is to get new thoughts.

The apostle Paul said,

“All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work”. 2 Timothy 3:16, 17

Certain “Key Passages” will be noted in a future article. There will also be a series of guided questions to help you along.

The second aspect is called “Prayer Therapy”: Pray at least three times a day. Use the prayer checklist to record your progress each day. Write down your prayers. Don’t worry about language or being hyper emotional. These things are normal.

Record your prayers in a journal or notebook. PRAY FOR ANYTHING THAT IS ON YOUR HEART! Carry this journal with you and when you begin to feel overwhelmed read what you have said to God.

You may feel the need to express deep dark emotions; this is perfectly fine. Jesus is our example of this. Many times he expressed his negative and hurt feelings in prayer.  The secret is to always end with a positive thought. On one occasion Jesus expressed his angst and emotional distress with the phrase “Let this cup pass from me”. In so doing he poured out his feelings of remorse and sorrow but he ended with a positive thought; “Not my will but yours be done”.  We must do the same.

February 19, 2011 Posted by | Counseling | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Education Of The Mind Part 1

Depression is a widespread condition, affecting millions of people, Christians and non-Christians alike. Those suffering from depression can experience intense feelings of sadness, anger, hopelessness, fatigue, and a variety of other symptoms. They may begin to feel useless and even suicidal, losing interest in things and people that they once enjoyed. Depression is often triggered by life circumstances, such as a loss of job, death of a loved one, divorce, or psychological problems such as abuse or low self-esteem.

The Bible tells us to be filled with joy and praise so God apparently intends for us all to live joyful lives. This is not easy for someone suffering from situational depression, but it can be remedied through God’s gifts of prayer, Bible study and application, support groups, fellowship among believers, confession, forgiveness, and counseling. We must make the conscious effort to not be absorbed in ourselves, but to turn our efforts outward. Feelings of depression can often be solved when those suffering with depression move the focus from themselves to Christ and others.

There are some things that those who suffer from depression can do to alleviate their anxiety. They should make sure that they are staying in the Word, even when they do not feel like it. Emotions can lead us astray, but God’s Word stands firm and unchanging. We must maintain strong faith in God and hold even more tightly to Him when we undergo trials and temptations. The Bible tells us that God will never allow temptations into our lives that are too much for us to handle. Although being depressed is not a sin, one is still accountable for the response to the affliction, including getting the professional help that is needed. “Through Jesus, therefore, let us continually offer to God a sacrifice of praise—the fruit of lips that confess his name”.

February 18, 2011 Posted by | Counseling | , , , , , | Leave a comment